Find a Teacher by Name
Year:
Name:

Find a District
Year:
District:

List all Districts      
Year:

Top 200 Salaries  
Year:

Welcome to the new home of the Teacher Salary Database. 


 

To sort a school district by salary, first locate the District in the "Find a District" list in the left panel (depending on the size of your screen, you might have to scroll down for the district list).

 

After you click on the district and the names and salaries appear, click on the word "Salary" located above the dollar-category and they will all sort by salary. They can also be supported by "Name."

 

FYI - the Illinois State Board of Education often changes how a school district is labelled, so it might be best to search by the school district's number.

 


What can I do if there is an error in my record? The information on this website is provided by the Illinois Board of Education (ISBE). Their source for this information is the Teacher Service Record, compiled and submitted annually by local school districts.

If you find an error in your record, you should contact your local school district and request that your information be corrected. If your local school district is not helpful, contact Mr. Mark Hobneck, mhobneck@isbe.net, at the Illinois State Board of Education.


Q&A: How do I start searching?

On the left side of this page, start by selecting the year you would like to know information about. Next, you can search by entering an employee's name* or you can get a listing of all the districts for a particular year or you can choose to see teacher and administrator salaries by the top 100 or average salary by district.

 

Note: To use the main search method, you must have Javascript. If you are having trouble, read "Having difficulty accessing the salary database?"

 

* In the employee name box type as much of the LAST name as possible followed by a SPACE then the FIRST name. ( ex. Smith John )

Where do you get this salary information and what does the data include?

The teacher data presented here is taken from the Teacher Service Record and is provided by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. THE TEACHER SERVICE RECORD IS THE SOLE SOURCE OF THIS DATA.

 

The word "salary" used here is synonymous with "compensation." According to the ISBE, the technical term for the data we post is "total creditable earnings."

 

Public school employees are compensated in many ways. The numbers we post are the official "total creditable earnings" that school districts report annually to the Illinois State Board of Education.

 

According to the ISBE, the annual salary data reported to them is the same as the "total creditable earnings" reported to the Teachers Retirement System. It includes, among other things, extra-duty pay (coaching, clubs, etc.), board-paid retirement contributions, vacation and sick day buyouts, bonuses, and other compensation that the Teachers Retirement System includes in total creditable earnings. This salary data does not include the cost of employer-paid health insurance. Individual school district contracts should be consulted for details.

 

All inquiries regarding the accuracy of this data should be directed via email to Mr. Mark Hobneck, mhobneck@isbe.net, at the Illinois State Board of Education (http://www.isbe.state.il.us)

Why are the salaries a year behind?

School years run from September to August. After each school year ends, each district is required to prepare and submit an annual Teacher Service Record, reflecting an employee's actual earnings for the entire school year just completed, including the summer term.

 

The due date for that report is October 1st; however, the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) states that districts are often late in submitting this report to them. Every October, our office submits a Freedom of Information request for this information to the ISBE. Our request is usually delayed because of the districts' failure to submit the required information in a timely manner. By the time we get the data and post it on our site, several months have usually elapsed.

 

Because we post actual earnings, the salaries on our site are for previous school years already completed. We do not post salary pay scales or projections, just actual earnings. This means we will always show previous school years' salaries, but we have no data for the current year.

For current salary information, contact the local school district.

What can I do if there is an error in my record?

The information on this website is provided by the Illinois Board of Education (ISBE). Their source for this information is the Teacher Service Record, compiled and submitted annually by local school districts.

 

If you find an error in your record, you should contact your local school district and request that your information be corrected. If your local school district is not helpful, contact Mr. Mark Hobneck, mhobneck@isbe.net, at the Illinois State Board of Education.

Why is my personal information on your website?

As a public school employee, your salary is paid with tax dollars, and is therefore available to the public.

Why do you post this salary information?

When school districts conduct referendum campaigns or lobby for more tax money, the financial data that they use is presented in a way that would support their demands. Often, these same misrepresentations are used by the media in their news coverage and in their editorials.

 

We post the salary data to give the taxpayer a source of information that presents complete and official salary totals as well as salary history. Taxpayers can see the salaries that are being paid, and can compare public school salary histories to those of the private sector and to the cost of living in their area.

 

We believe that providing accurate, complete information regarding teacher and administrator salaries will help taxpayers in determining whether their district is using tax money wisely, and in deciding if a tax increase is necessary.

Why do you think teachers are paid too much?

We encourage you to read the article "What to know about Illinois Public School Teacher and Administrator Pay" at the Family Taxpayers Foundation website.

 

We do not believe that all school employees are overpaid, although we do believe that the current public education system does not serve the best interests of the students or of the taxpayers who are funding that system. The current system is fraught with management practices that have no bearing on the quality of education. It serves the tenure-protected union member of long standing. It also forms the basis for an overly-generous pension system that has become a financially unsustainable burden on this state's general revenue budget.

 

We believe there is a better way - competition. We believe that public sector employees should be paid the same way private sector employees are paid, by job performance with pay set according to the free market.

 

We believe everything from continuing education benefits to pay raises to promotions and staffing decisions should be assessed on the basis of student achievement. Public schools exist to educate children, not to provide generous careers for educators. This is why improving student achievement should be the basis for all public school management decisions.

What is Champion News' opinion of the salaries?

Salaries vary greatly among school districts, and within a district as well. We find that salary level is not a good indication of how well a particular district or employee is performing. For example, a school district that has good achievement scores is not necessarily paying the highest salaries.

 

Many research studies have concluded that higher salaries do not guarantee better schools. This is because the current system rewards teachers on several criteria that have no connection to good work performance - tenure, continuing education, degrees held, etc. As a result, many good teachers are underpaid and many mediocre teachers are overpaid.

 

The bottom line is that free market principles should govern teacher and administrator pay. The current government-conferred public school monopoly needs to be replaced with a system where good work performance based on student achievement is rewarded with good pay.

 

Champion News supports school choice because of the improvements such a free market system has been proven to bring about, both academically and fiscally. Teacher and administrator salary levels, salary increases, and pensions are out of kilter primarily due to the fact that the public schools operate within the protection of that monopoly. Secondarily, many local school boards are no match for the well-funded and well-organized unions. As a result, many districts are strong-armed into management decisions that serve those special interests, creating a ballooning financial fiasco for the taxpayer.